Notes from the Minutes of the M.E. Church 1884-1888

The following are notes on people connected with Franklin County, taken from the published minutes of the Methodist Episcopal Church / Northern New York Conference. There may be others in these sources that have connections to the county. I have simply transcribed the portions where the connections are evident (birth and death places, or place of appointments, etc., are within the county).


1884

Source: Minutes of the Twelfth Session of the Northern New York Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Held in the First M. E. Church, Utica, N.Y, April 9th to 16th, 1884, published by the Secretaries, Curtiss & Childs, Printers, 167 Genessee Street, Utica, N.Y, 1884

Appointments

Bangor, To be supplied
Burke, G. S. Hastings, 1
Chateaugay, A. D. Webster, 1
Constable, A. C. Eddy, 2
Dickinson, To be supplied by Frank Howard, 1
Fort Covington and Bombay, W. F. Ball, 1
Malone, W. F. Tooke, 3
Moira, W. H. Kanoff, 2
St. Regis Indian Mission, To be supplied by Thomas La Forte
South Malone, To be supplied by W. A. Wood, 2

Memoirs

REV. RUFUS E. KING.

Rev. Rufus E. King passed from labor to reward on Friday, July 27th, 1883. He died of acute dysentery. He was born in the town of Lempster, county of Cheshire, State of New Hampshire, April 10th, 1811, and was a little over 72 years of age.

In a brief sketch of his own life, he mentions the death of his dear Christian mother, when he was but four and one-half years old. In the spring of 1816, he moved with his father to the town of Eden, Orleans Co., State of Vermont. In 1826, he removed with his father's family to the town of Bangor, county of Franklin, N. Y. At the age of fourteen, he speaks of conviction for sin and his great need of salvation, and of being faithful in the use of the means of grace for a while, but under the force of temptation he fell away, and remained indifferent until he was about eighteen years of age. At that time he was the subject of powerful conviction while listening to a sermon from Rev. G. C. Woodruff; but it was not until about three years after having passed through fearful struggles and deep anguish of soul, that he resolved to be a Christian. After this he was faithful in the discharge of duty, when on the 14th of December, 1830, in a little prayer meeting, he says, "I received a sensible evidence of the pardon of my sins through faith in the Redeemer's blood." He was soon put in charge of a large class as its leader. It was at this time that he felt a strong conviction that it was his duty to preach the gospel. The church acknowledged the call and he was licensed by Rev. Win. C. Mason in 1835 to exhort and preach in the same year.

During the greater part of the next three years he pursued an active and laborious life for the support of himself and family. He was known at this time as the mail carrier, traveling on horseback between Malone and Potsdam. But in "labors more abundant" he found time to study and preach. The Bible, the Hymn book, the Commentary and Christian Biography, together with the works of Wesley, Fletcher, Watson, were his chief studies.

In 1838 he was employed by Rev. W. S. Bowdish, P. E., on the Chateaugay Circuit with Allen Castle, preacher in charge. In 1839 he labored on the same circuit with H. 0. Tilden in charge. In 1840 he was employed by Rev. Lewis Whitcomb, P. E., on the Bombay Circuit. In 1841 he joined the Black River Conference. In this relation he has faithfully served the following charges: Bucks Bridge, Norfolk, West Stockholm, Bombay, Moira, St. Regis Indian Mission, Martinsburg, Copenhagen, North Potsdam, Nicholville, Brasher, Colton and Coxe's Mills, Louisville, Ellsworth, (supernumerary.) In 1871 he was made effective and appointed to Ellsworth, (supernumerary.) In 1871 he was made effective and appointed to Ellsworth, and afterwards served West Stockholm, Moira and Norfolk for a second term. From this time he sustained a superannuated relation.

Rev. Rufus E. King was an able minister of the New Testament. Puritan blood, from which comes heroes for the work of the world's regeneration, ran in his veins. He came upon the stage when the country was new and the people poor. The opportunities for education were limited. These he improved in the common school so as to be quite proficient in the various branches of an English education. Blessed with a retentive and well trained memory, stored with a thorough knowledge of the scriptures, he was skillful in handling the word of life. His manner of preaching was extempore. He was systematic in arrangement, earnest, clear and forcible in delivery. His pulpit ministrations were attended with a divine influence that carried the truth home to the hearts of his hearers.

The stability of his character and his attachment to the church and ministry of his choice, was tested in that crisis in the history of the church when some of our best men felt it to be their duty to withdraw, because of its relation to slavery. Among those that left and became active in their opposition to the church, was his own brother, who up to that time was a talented and useful minister. This brother, a senior by many years in age and experience, made every effort to produce disaffection in his mind; but he stood firm as a rock.

The records of the old Black River Conference show that he was the father of the movement for a committee on the use of tobacco. He agitated the subject from year to year, until the Conference passed a resolution to request the Bishop to put the question to every candidate for admission: Do you use tobacco?" A negative answer to this question was made a condition of reception.

It is due to the memory of Brother King to say that the seed by him sown, has grown to be a great tree. Other conferences have felt the power of this example and have adopted similar resolutions, and the General Conference of 1880 made total abstinence from this foul practice a condition of admission into the traveling connection.

Brother King was married three times—December 3, 1833, to Miss Mary Gibs, whose son Charles left home many years ago, and is living in the West; December 7, 1841, to Miss Harriet E. Cornish, whose two sons were present to witness the closing scenes of the few days in which the mortal life of their father went out; May 2, 1853, to Miss Angeline J. Prentice, who survives him in very feeble health. Her eldest son, a promising young man, died a few years since. The youngest son, who takes the name of his father, joined the Northern New York Conference at its last session. It is worthy of note, as the father exchanges the cross for the crown, the son enters the field, and the family is still represented in the ministry.

The remains, after appropriate services attended by a large concourse of people and conducted by Rev. S. 0. Barnes, P. E., assisted by several ministers, were buried by the side of those of his son, in Bayside cemetery, Potsdam.

W. H. HAWKINS.

In Memory of the Deceased Wives of Members of Northern N.Y. Conference

Name, wife of, Place of Death, Date of Death, Age
Amanda Shepard, H. Shepard, Malone, 27 Aug 1880, 69
Mary E. Sherman, R. Sherman, South Malone, 1 May 1880, 35

Post Office Directory of the Members, Probationers, Supplies, Widows of Deceased Members and Local Preachers of the Northern New York Conference 1884-5.

Members

Name, Address, Joined on Probation, Relation
Ball, Wilson F., Fort Covington, 1869, P.C.
Bigelow, Andrew F., Malone, 1844, Sup.
Hastings, George S., Burke, 1872, P.C.
Helms, William R., Saint Regis Fall, 1868, P.C.
Kanoff, William H., Moira, 1876, P.C.
Tooke, Wesley F., Malone, 1862, P.C.
Webster, Anson D., Chateaugay, 1869, P.C.

Supplies

Name, Address, Joined on Probation, Relation
Howard, Frank, Dickinson, Licentiate
La Fort, thomas, Hogansburgh, Elder
Wood, William A., Malone, Deacon

Widows of Deceased Members

Name, Post Office Address, Widow of
Sarah Greenleaf, Brushton Franklin county, G. D. Greenleaf

Local Preachers

Name, Address, Relation
Hyde, Horace W., North Bangor, Deacon
Johnson, Charles, West Constable, Elder
Meeker, Amos R., Moira, Licentiate
Runion, J. W., Dickinson Centre, Licentiate
Todd, R. H., Malone, Licentiate


1885

Source: Minutes of the Thirteenth Session of the Northern New York Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Held in Ogdensburg, N.Y, April 9th to 14th, 1885, published by the Secretaries, Chas. E. Holbrook, Book and Job Printer, 1885

Appointments

Bangor, W. C. Lent, 1
Belmont, To be supplied
Burke, G. S. Hastings, 2
Chateaugay, A. D. Webster, 2
Constable, A. C. Eddy, 3
Fort Covington and Bombay, R. Sherman, 1
Malone, I. D. Peaslee, 1
Moira, W. H. Kanoff, 3
St. Regis Indian Mission, (supply) Thomas La Forte
South Malone, To be supplied

Memoirs

MRS. SARAH A. SMITH.

Mrs. Sarah A. wife of Rev. A. L. Smith, of Evans Mills, N. Y., Northern New York Conference, died November 10, 1884 aged 41 years and 13 days.

This noble Christian woman was born in Chateaugay, Franklin county, N. Y., October 28, 1843. She was converted in that wonderfully extensive revival which swept over the town of Chateaugay, under the pastorate of Rev. Alonzo Wells, in the Winter of 1857-'58, and immediately united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which she has been an honored member ever since. She was united in marriage to the Rev. A. L. Smith, January 5, 1861, and in the Spring following, she entered upon her life work with her devoted husband.

Sister Smith, as all who knew her can testify, was devoted to the work of the itinerancy in an unusual degree. She was a constant reader, especially of our solid literature, so that few women were as well informed in general knowledge, or as well posted in Methodist doctrine and history as she. In the prayer and class-meetings she was always present with her testimony; in the Bible class she exhibited superior ability in explaining the Scriptures, and in protracted efforts she delighted to stand by the side of her husband. At the time of her death she was president bf the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of Evans Mills, in which she took great interest. It is a marvel to us all that she should thus "cease at once to work and live," since she was a woman of such vigorous health that any one would have taken a lease of her life. Her rapid decline illustrates how trivial circumstances may lead to grave results. A slight bruise led to a cancer; coupled with this was the taking of a cold resulting in a cough, and though the former was extracted and the breast healed, the latter could not be checked, and resulted in her death. During her sickness she was wonderfully sustained, exhibiting great patience and fortitude, and not until the last day did she give up. To one of her sons who expressed to her the hope that she would recover she said that she was going down, and for a moment her voice faltered, but she rallied and shouted, "The Lord is good; he will give grace and glory. the Lord will bless you, my dear husband, he will bless you and the children," and her spirit fled to her home in the skies. A sorrowing and loving husband and four children, two of whom are most promising young men, both in the Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn., mourn the loss of a precious wife and mother.

W. WATSON

Roll of the honored Dead of the Northern New York Conference

Admitted, Name, Conference Relation, Years in Effective Service, Death Place, Death Date, Age
1857, George G. Greenleaf, Sup., 17, Moira, 18 May 1876, 66

In Memory of the Deceased Wives of Members of Northern N. Y. Conference

Name, Wife of, Death Place, Death Date, Age
Amanda Shepard, H. Shepard, Malone, 27 Aug 1880, 69
Mary E. sherman, R. Sherman, South Malone, 1 May 1880, 85

Members

Joined, Name, Relation, Address
1872, Hastings, George S, P.C., Burke
1876, Kanoff, William H, P.C., Moira
1858, Lent, Wyatt C., P.C., Bangor
1863, Peaslee, Isaac D., P.C., Malone
1879, Sherman, Reuben, P.C., Fort Covington

Supplies

Name, Orders, Charge, P.O. Address
Kay, James R., Licentiate, South Malone, Malone
LaFort, Thomas, Elder, St. Regis Mission, Hogansburg
Wood, Wm. A., Deacon, Belmont, Chateaugay Lake

Local Preachers

Name, Relation, Place, Address
Johnson, Charles, Elder, Constable, West Constable
Meeker, Amos R., Licentiate, Moira, Moira
Pierce, Mial R., Elder, Burke, Burke
Todd, Reuben H., Licentiate, Malone, Malone

Widows of Deceased members

Name, Widow of, Address
Greenleaf, Sarah, Rev. George D. Greenleaf, Brushton


1886

Source: Minutes of the Fourteenth Session of the Northern New York Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Held in Fulton, N.Y, April 15th to 20th, 1886, published by the Secretaries, R. J. Oliphant, Job Printer, Bookbinder and Stationer, 1886

Appointments

Bangor, ...
Belmont (P.O. Chateaugay Lake), W. A. Wood, 2
Burke, ...
Chateaugay, A. D. Webster, 3
Constable (P.O. East Constable), W. C. Lent, 1
Ft. Covington and Bombay, Reuben Sherman, 2
Malone, I. D. Peaslee, 2
Moira, W. A. Nichols, 1
Saint Regis Indian Mission (P.O. Hogansburg), Thomas La Fort
South Malone (P.O. Titus), James R. Kay, 2
Waverly and Dickinson (P.O. St. Regis Falls), J. P. Dunham, 1

Memoirs

MRS. ANGELINE J. KING

Mrs. Angeline J. King died in Norfolk, N.Y., August 10, 1885, aged 63 years.

Mrs. King, whose maiden name was Prentiss, was born in Bangor, Franklin Co., N. Y. Her parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. When but a child her thought was turned to the subject of religion, and while attending a camp-meeting in her native place she was converted, and at once cast in her lot with the Methodists.

In May, 1853, she was married with Rev. Rufus E. King, of the Black River Conference, and for thirty years she shared with him the trials and labors of the itinerancy. In labors Sister King was abundant. The Sunday School and prayer meeting felt her influence and revived. But it was in her own home that she exhibited those Christian virtues which are always the fruit of a heavenly faith and love. The children felt the constancy of her watchfulness and the guidance of her firm but gentle spirit. Sister King was somewhat reserved in manner and greatly liked unpretentious worth wherever found.

Two years ago she suffered a great bereavement in the death of her husband, since which time she has lived with her sons, the Rev. R. E. King, Jr., and Carol King, in Norfolk, N. Y., at whose home she died. Her experience at the close was what might have been expected.

At the last interview with her pastor she was found to be calm, resigned and full of the immortal hope; at last her sun sank cloudless and she was at rest. Her remains were laid by the side of Brother King in Bayside Cemetery. Potsdam.

C. N. Higby.

Members [some names are blank]

Joined, Name, Relation, Address
1876, Dunham, James P., P.C., St. Regis Falls
1858, Lent, Wyatt C., P.C., East Constable
1863, Peaslee, Isaac D., P.C., Malone
1879, Sherman, Reuben, P.C., Fort Covington
1869, Webster, Anson D., P.C., Chateaugay

Supplies

Name, Relation, Address
La Fort, Thomas, Elder, Hogansburg
Wood, William A., Deacon, Chateaugay Lake

Local Preachers

Name, Relation, Address
Hyde, Horace W., Deacon, North Bangor
Johnson, Charles, Elder West Constable
Meaker, Amos R., Licentiate, Moira
Pierce, Mial R., Elder, Burke
Todd, Reuben, Licentiate, Malone

Widows of Deceased Members

Greenleaf, Sarah, widow of Rev. George D. Greenleaf, Brushton, N.Y.


1887

Source: Minutes of the Fifteenth Session of the Northern New York Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Held in Little Falls, April 14th to April 19th, 1887, published by the Secretaries, R. J. Oliphant, Job Printer, Bookbinder, and Stationer, 1887

Appointments

Bangor, J. H. Myers, 1
Belmont (P.O. Chateaugay Lake), Eugene Sauls, 1
Burke, William Thomas, 2
Chateaugay, W. W. Van Dusen, 1
Constable (P.O. East Constable), W. C. Lent, 2
Ft. Covington & Bombay, S. J. Greenfield, 1
Malone, I. D. Peaslee, 3
Moira, M. D. sill, 1
St. Regis Falls & Dickinson, J. P. Dunham, 2
St. Regis Indian Mission (P.O. Hogansburg), Ebenezer Arnold, 2
South Malone (P.O. Titus), James R. Kay, 3

Memoirs

MRS. JULIA A. WELLS.

Mrs. Julia Ann Wells, wife of Rev. Alonzo Wells, of Northern New York Conference, died at their home in Lawrence, St. Lawrence County, N. Y., April 26, 1886. Sister Wells was born in Constable, Franklin County, N. Y., in 1823. She was converted at the age of thirteen, consecrating her early life to Jesus. In 1851 she was married with Rev. A. Wells, to assume the responsibilities of the wife of a minister and family as well. Six children were given them as the fruit of their marriage, which added much to their responsibility. For years Sister Wells was a teacher in the schools of her neighborhood by authority of a State certificate for teaching. For thirty-five years she served the church in a more public manner as the faithful wife of a Christian minister. The record now shows that she filled the offices of mother, companion and member of society most remarkably. Her great judiciousness stands as a monumental fact in the relations she sustained. When at no time the salary was large, her children were well educated, two of whom were sent to college ; one, Prof. N. A. Wells, is now. in Syracuse University. The forethought and devotion of such a mother and companion the husband and children cannot forget, neither should the church fail to make mention of the Christian heroism of one whose life for so many years was given to its prosperity. A few weeks before her departure she exerted great will power, that her illness might not interfere with the long-cherished desire of her son to visit Europe, to behold the paintings of the celebrated masters for more complete college work. But she was nut to remain long—the crown was awaiting her. Her soul was kept by the power of God unto salvation. About two weeks before she died great peace and a glorious victory came to her, bringing additional assurance of Jesus' raving power. The last work she did on earth, when the battle was so fierce between life and death, was to dictate a letter to the W. F. M. Society, of which she was a choice member. Thus another has been transferred from the Church militant to the Church triumphant. She died with great expectation. Her memory is precious, her life vocal for Christ. The funeral was held at the home of her brother, John Cargin, in Constable, in the house where she was married thirty-five years before. Many of the friends were present, together with quite a number of her early associates. The writer officiated on the occasion. The body rests in the family burial place. The spirit is at peace with God.

I. D. PEASLEE.

Roll of Honor

Name, Place of Death, Date of Death, Age, Joined, Years of Service, Relationship
George G. Greenleaf, Moira, 18 May 1876, 66, 1857, 17, Sup.

Deceased Wives of Members of Norther N.Y. Conference

Name, Wife of, Place of Death, Date of Death, Age
Amanda Shepard, Hiram Shepard, Malone, 27 Aug 1880, 69
Mary E. Sherman, Reuben Sherman, South Malone, 1 May 1880, 35

Directory

Members

Joined, Name, Relation, Address
1838, Arnold, Ebenezer, P.C., Hogansburgh
1844, Begelow, Andrew F., Sup, Malone
1876, Dunham, James P., P.C., St. Regis Falls
1858, Lent, Wyatt C., P.C., East Constable
1848, Nichals, William A., Sy., Moira
1863, Peaslee, Isaac D., P.C., Malone
1884, Sill, Mathew D., P.C., Moira
1880, VanDusen, Wilmot W., P.C., Chateaugay

Probationers

Name, Relation, Address
Myers, Julian H., Not Ord, Bangor
Thomas, William, Not Ord, Burke

Supplies

Name, Relation, Address
Sauls, Eugene, Not Ord, Chateaugay Lake

Local Preachers

Name, Relation, Address
Hyde, Horace w., Deacon, North Bangor
Johnson, Charles, Elder, West Constable
Meeker, Amos R., Licentiate, Moira
Pierce, Mial R., Elder, Burke
Todd, Reuben, Licentiate, Malone
Wood, William A., Deacon, Chateaugay Lake

Widows of Deceased Members

Greenleaf, Sarah, widow of Rev. George D. Greenleaf, Brushton


1888

Source: Minutes of the Sixteenth Session of the Northern New York Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Held in Rome, 1888, published by the Secretaries, R. J. Oliphant, Printer and Stationer, 1888

This volume has a complete listing of members who were removed (by death or otherwise) as well as a listing and history of the appointments of current members, under a supplement called Historical Register. (members in this case are those who held ministerial appointments)

Appointments

Bangor, J. H. Myers, 2
Bellmont (P.O. Chateaugay Lake)
Burke, Henry Hesselgrave, 1
Chateaugay, W. W. VanDusen, 2
Constable (P.O. East Constable), W. A. Wood, 1
Ft Covington and Bombay, S. J. Greenfield, 2
Malone, W. D. Marsh, 1
Moira, M. D. Sill, 2
St. Regis Falls and Dickinson, J. P Dunham, 3
St. Regis Indian Mission (P.O. Hogansburg), ...

Memoirs

REV. ANDREW F. BIGELOW.

Andrew F. Bigelow was born in Plattsburgh, March 18, 1824, and died Sept. 20, 1887, in the 64th year of his age. When three years old he moved with his parents to Bangor, N. Y. In early life he evinced a love for knowledge. At fourteen years he availed himself of the best possible advantages, within his reach, for an education. He then began attending the Malone Academy, where he made the record of a diligent student and was then acknowledged as the brightest in the school, as some now living can testify. Like many of fifty years ago he worked his way. It is found now that it is better to work one's way than to have it worked for him, as he only is worthy of success who pays the price. Andrew F. Bigelow began teaching district schools at fifteen years of age and continued it for five Winters. His mind was of a high order. It dwelt upon questions abstract and fundamental. He excelled in mathematics. Such an order of mind is rare, although it may be not of the most practical kind. It may be likened to a mountain peak where a few of mortals climb. Such a mind is oceanic, expansive, deep. His desire for knowledge found its way to severe investigation and the consumption of whole nights in reading books. While the mind was being fed the body of course suffered under such circumstances. It is well to pause at this time in the presence of such extraordinary endowments. There was a kind of boldness in his mental processes. Says Lord Bacon: "Certainly to men of good judgment bold persons are a sport to beholders ; nay, and to the vulgar also bold-ness has somewhat of the ridiculous; for if absurdity be the subject of laughter, doubt you not but what great boldness is seldom without absurdity." Brother Bigelow professed faith in Christ at the age of thirteen. It is encouraging that much attention is turned to the matter of early conversion.

For the facts of his Ministerial life see Historial Register, page 11. He supplied the pulpit at Ogdensburg from October 1877 to April 1878, during the illness of the pastor. He lived the last year and a half in the town of Malone. As a public man he was known as somewhat eccentric, which phase of life was not taken on to attract attention merely, but grew out of his social and mental qualities. It was part of himself. He was true to himself. In this light it is to be commended as an element of strength, Those who knew him as a preacher speak highly of his pulpit efforts. At times he would. rise by the inspiration of the hour to a plane seldom traveled by preachers. His analytic mind would grasp the central thought, and his utterances on special occasions were perfectly astonishing. It is commonly reported by those who knew him and heard him when a great demand appeared for a great effort for sanctified eloquence, Rev. A. F. Bigelow was the man. People now talk of a remarkable sermon he preached on the Moira camp grounds.

In 1847 he was united in marriage with Marion Albina Purmort, who remains to mourn the loss of the companion of her early and late years. There are living, four children; two sons and two daughters.

The funeral was held Sept. 23, the services being in the Methodist Episcopal church at Malone. There was a very large attendance, including nine clergymen. The writer conducted the services, and remarks were also made most appropriate to the occasion by Revs. A. Bramley, E. Arnold and L. L. Palmer.

Brother Bigelow had the discipline of long suffering. He is at peace and rest now. His hope in the merit of Christ did not forsake him at the last. By faith he threw himself into the arms of his Saviour. He said, "I am not going to the judgment to plead my own merits nor anything I have done." These words gave him comfort: "Jesus loves me, this I know, for the Bible tells me so." The life that began sixty-three years ago has come to a close—do I say close? It seems so. It is the earthly life that ends here, the heavenly never terminates. He has joined the heavenly company.

I. D. PEASLEE.

Roll of the Honored Dead of the Northern new York Conference

Name, Place of Death, Date of Death, Age, Joined, Yrs of Service, Relation
George G. Greenleaf, Moira, 18 May 1876, 66, 1857, 17, Sup.
Andrew F. Bigelow, Malone, 20 Sep 1887, 65, 1850, 37, Eff.

In Memory of the Deceased Wives of Members of Northern N.Y. Conference

Name, Wife of, Place of Death, Date od Death, Age
Amanda Shepard, Hiram Shepard, Malone, 27 Aug 1880, 69
Mary E. Sherman, Reuben Sherman, South Malone, 1 May 1880, 35 [definite!... easily read]

Members

Joined, Name, Relation, Address
1839, Arnold, Ebenezer (crossed out by hand), Sup., Hogansburg
1882, Greenfield, Samuel J., P.C., Fort Covington
1864, Hesselgrave, Henry, P.C., Burke
1858, Lent, Wyatt C., Sup., East Constable
1883, Marsh, William D., P.C., Malone
1843, Nichols, William A. (crossed out by hand), Sy, Moira
1884, Sill, Matthew D., P.C., Moira
1880, VanDusen, Wilmot W., P.C., Chateaugay

Probationers

Name, Relation, Address
Myers, Julian H., Not Ord, Bangor

Supplies

Name, Relation, Address
Wood, William A., Deacon, East Constable

Local Preachers

Name, Relation, Address
Hyde, Horace W., Deacon, North Bangor
Johnson, Charles, Elder, West Constable
Meeker, Amost R., Licentiate, Moira
Todd, Reuben, Licentiate, Malone
Williams, Thomas, Licentiate, Hogansburg

Widows of deceased Members

Bigelow, Marion A., widow of Rev. Andrew F. Bigelow, Malone
Greenleaf, Sarah, widow of Rev. George D. Greenleaf, Brushton